7 Things You Need to Know About the Decision to End DACA
March 20, 2018 at 12:00 AM
by Law Offices of Lara Wagner LLC
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On September 5th, the administration announced that it is phasing out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA. DACA, created in 2012 by President Obama, provided freedom from deportation, work permits, and social security numbers to some 800,000 young immigrants who were brought to the United States as children. Here are 7 things you need to know about the decision to phase out DACA:

1. If you currently have DACA, it is valid until its expiration date.

DACA and the associated work permits are valid until their listed expiration date. The expiration date can be found on your work permit or on the approval notice for your DACA.

2. Your social security number does not expire.

Your social security number is valid for life, even after your work permit and DACA approvals expire. Your social security number does contain a condition that requires a valid work permit to use it for employment purposes. However, you can continue to use it for education, banking, housing, and taxes.

3. If your DACA expires before March 5, 2018, you can still renew it!

If your current period of DACA expires between now and March 5, 2018, you can file to renew it. However, the renewal application must be received before October 5, 2017. DHS will not accept any applications received after October 5.

4. Pending DACA and EAD applications will be adjudicated.

If you had an initial or a renewal application pending when the announcement was made on September 5, you will receive a decision on that application.

5. Pending Advance Parole applications will not be adjudicated and new applications will not be accepted.

If you had an application for advance parole pending when the announcement was made on September 5, no decision will be made on that application and the filing fee will be returned to you. No new applications for advance parole will be accepted.

6. If you currently have a valid advance parole document, you can still use it to travel.

If you were granted advance parole before the announcement was made, and your travel document is still valid, you can still use it to travel. However, you must return before the document expires. Further, Customs and Border Patrol can still deny you entry. It is important to consult with an immigration attorney before traveling.

7. If you have never applied for DACA before, you are no longer able to apply.

If you have never applied for DACA before, you are no longer able to do so.

If you have any further questions about DACA, please book a consultation online.
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